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Posted by Internet Freedom on Tue 21st Jan 20:04
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  1.    
  2. *** THE INTERNET IS A TOOL FOR SURVIVAL ***
  3.    
  4. *** ALL INTERNET USERS ARE UNDER ATTACK ***
  5.    
  6.  I RECOMMEND PEOPLE BACKUP EVERYTHING THEY HAVE -
  7. EVERYTHING THEY CAN GET - TO HARDCOPY - RIGHT NOW.
  8. SOFTWARE, MEDIA, INFORMATION, WEBSITE ARCHIVES,
  9. TOOLKITS, PHOTOS, MUSIC, MOVIES, ROMS, FONTS,
  10. TORRENT CLIENTS, TOR & OTHER WEB BROWSERS, ETC.
  11.    
  12. *** BACKUP EVERYTHING, WHILE YOU STILL CAN ***
  13.    
  14.  MEANWHILE, START LOOKING FOR ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF
  15. ENERGY, TO PROVIDE ELECTRICITY. THE NEXT VECTOR OF
  16. ATTACK BY CORPORATE FASCIST POWERS WILL LIKELY BE
  17. THE ENERGY GRID ITSELF! YOU WERE WARNED! THEIR TRUE
  18. AGENDA IS TO SHUT OUR SURVIVAL COMMUNICATIONS DOWN!
  19.    
  20.    
  21.  A federal appeals court nullified key provisions of
  22. the FCC’s net neutrality rules, opening the door to a
  23. curated approach to internet delivery that allows
  24. broadband providers to block content or applications
  25. as they see fit.
  26.  
  27. http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2014/01/court-kills-net-neutrality/
  28.    
  29.          ◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►
  30.    
  31.  If you don’t know what ‘Net Neutrality’ means, then
  32. now is the time learn it. It’s a good thing, but it’s
  33. under direct threat. It’s very simple:
  34.  
  35.  “Net Neutrality (also network neutrality or Internet
  36. neutrality) is the principle that Internet service
  37. providers and governments should treat all data on
  38. the Internet equally, not discriminating or charging
  39. differentially by user, content, site, platform,
  40. application, type of attached equipment, and modes
  41. of communication (Wiki)
  42.  
  43.  Today, The Register reports that a US appeals court
  44. has ruled that net neutrality measures put in place
  45. by America’s Federal Communications Commission …
  46. are ‘invalid’.
  47.  
  48.  “The FCC’s latest attempt to compel ISPs to treat
  49. all traffic on an equal basis suffered a significant
  50. blow, after the US Court of Appeals for the District
  51. of Columbia Circuit said (PDF)”.
  52.  
  53. http://www.cadc.uscourts.gov/internet/opinions.nsf/3AF8B4D938CDEEA685257C6000532062/$file/11-1355-1474943.pdf
  54.  
  55.  This digression on the part of the US courts reared
  56. its ugly head on Tuesday, when a three-panel appeals
  57. court essentially rolled over for corporate giant
  58. Verizon, claiming that “the FCC had classified
  59. broadband service providers in a manner that excludes
  60. ISPs from the anti-blocking and anti-discrimination
  61. requirements instilled through the Open Internet
  62. Order.”
  63.  
  64.  This is potentially a serious blow to Americans –
  65. as well as internet users in Europe, freedom to
  66. access information and enjoy the choice they’ve
  67. become used to over the last decade and a half,
  68. should understand where this counter-revolutionary
  69. push is coming from. It’s not so much a government
  70. agenda, although the government is making the legal
  71. move. It is a corporate drive to extract more profit
  72. and exert more control over users.
  73.  
  74.  Wiki continues, “There has been extensive debate
  75. about whether net neutrality should be required by
  76. law. Since the early 2000s, advocates of net
  77. neutrality and associated rules have raised concerns
  78. about the ability of broadband providers to use
  79. their last mile infrastructure to block Internet
  80. applications and content (e.g. websites, services,
  81. and protocols), and even block out competitors.”
  82.  
  83.  The corporations along with their legions of lawyers,
  84. are planning to throttle the internet in order to
  85. bake the pie again, this time securing a bigger
  86. monopoly of control. There will be a fast lane
  87. and a slow lane, and corporate raiders will make
  88. very difficult for anyone in the slow lane, including
  89. cutting down bandwidth and access.
  90.  
  91.  That monopoly will be divided up by the cartel
  92. comprised of media moguls like Verizon, Google,
  93. Microsoft and Apple. Content will plentiful, but
  94. predictably bland, unintelligent and politically
  95. vacuous. The real power will be in controlling
  96. content along that last mile, which means that
  97. telecoms and cable providers like AT&T, Comcast
  98. and Verizon (and soon Google) will be pivotal in
  99. making this corporate counter-revolution a reality.
  100.  
  101.  Another problem is that corporate cartels would
  102. like to implement a bigger pay-per-view internet
  103. experience. Basic access could be metered by time
  104. or by data usage, or degrees of access could be
  105. dependent on how much you pay your ISPs. Basic
  106. access would probably be a lot of junk like basic
  107. cable TV, followed by an ‘extended basic’, or you
  108. pay for the gold package and then you get to view
  109. all content online. Either scenario will be a major
  110. shift away from what you have now.
  111.  
  112.  A return to the good old day when 3 networks and
  113. a handful of newspapers had a stranglehold over
  114. information and reality. Because of stringent
  115. regulation – which is the collusion of state and
  116. corporate interests, only large well-funded economies
  117. of scale will be able to broadcast from the top
  118. tier content portals online, which means that many
  119. mid-major independent media outlets will be forced
  120. to opt for a private subscription-based model to
  121. finance their operations. For non-profit and small
  122. independents, they will be relegated to the internet
  123. junk yard of random restricted access, slow speeds,
  124. disappearing pages, and a jungle of malware.
  125.  
  126.  The disappearance of any meaningful anti-trust
  127. regulation (which about the only really useful
  128. function of a federal government) is what has
  129. enabled ridiculously large monopolies across
  130. broadcast media, content distribution and publishing
  131. in the US. This happened because media lobbyists
  132. in Washington DC were able to bribe and browbeat
  133. spineless politicians into line with the great
  134. corporate agenda. In the Net Neutrality story,
  135. the same players are replicating exactly the same
  136. model.
  137.  
  138.  Not only can they take all of your metadata – now
  139. they can shut down your access. That might cut into
  140. the NSA’s data stocks, but the next faze of the
  141. corporate internet will feature much more about
  142. keeping dissenting voices from gaining any kind
  143. of large, crossover audience.
  144.  
  145.  Congress still has the option to mandate neutrality
  146. in some form, but net lovers should rally behind
  147. this issue now, or all will be lost - forever.
  148.  
  149. http://21stcenturywire.com/2014/01/16/corporate-raiders-use-govt-to-attack-net-neutrality-and-what-it-means-to-freedom/
  150.    
  151.          ◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►
  152.    
  153.  The worst fears of all free speech proponents are
  154. upon us. The Verizon suit against the Federal Communications
  155. Commission, appellate decision sets the stage for a Supreme
  156. Court review. The Wall Street Journal portrays the ruling
  157. in financial terms: “A federal court has tossed out the
  158. FCC’s “open internet” rules, and now internet service
  159. providers are free to charge companies like Google and
  160. Netflix higher fees to deliver content faster.”
  161.  
  162.  In essence, this is the corporate spin that the decision
  163. is about the future cost for being connected.
  164.  
  165.  “The ruling was a blow to the Obama administration, which
  166. has pushed the idea of “net neutrality.” And it sharpened
  167. the struggle by the nation’s big entertainment and
  168. telecommunications companies to shape the regulation of
  169. broadband, now a vital pipeline for tens of millions of
  170. Americans to view video and other media.
  171.  
  172.  For consumers, the ruling could usher in an era of tiered
  173. Internet service, in which they get some content at full
  174. speed while other websites appear slower because their
  175. owners chose not to pay up.
  176.  
  177.  “It takes the Internet into completely uncharted territory,”
  178. said Tim Wu, a Columbia University law professor who coined
  179. the term net neutrality.
  180.  
  181.  What the Journal is not telling you is that this uncharted
  182. territory is easy to project. If ISP’s will be able to
  183. charge varied rates or decide to vary internet speed, it
  184. is a very short step towards selectively discriminate
  185. against sites based upon content. Do not get lulled into
  186. thinking that constitutional protective political speech
  187. is guaranteed.
  188.  
  189.  Once again, the world according to the communication giants
  190. paint a very different interpretation as the article, Verizon
  191. called hypocritical for equating net neutrality to censorship
  192. illustrates.
  193.  
  194.  “Verizon’s argument that network neutrality regulations
  195. violated the firm’s First Amendment rights. In Verizon’s
  196. view, slowing or blocking packets on a broadband network
  197. is little different from a newspaper editor choosing which
  198. articles to publish, and should enjoy the same constitutional
  199. protection.”
  200.  
  201.  The response from advocates of the Net Neutrality standard,
  202. that is about to vanish, sums up correctly.
  203.  
  204.  “The First Amendment does not apply, however, when Verizon
  205. is merely transmitting the content of third parties. Moreover,
  206. these groups point out, Verizon itself has disclaimed
  207. responsibility for its users’ content when it was convenient
  208. to do so, making its free speech arguments ring hollow.”
  209.  
  210.  Prepare for the worst. The video, Prepare To Be Robbed.
  211. Net Neutrality Is Dead!, which includes frank language and
  212. expletives, provides details that place the use of internet
  213. access into question coming out of this appellate decision.
  214.  
  215. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usB-FDET3ds
  216.    
  217.          ◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►
  218.    
  219. Verizon users might want to switch services.
  220.  
  221.  The United States Court of Appeals for the
  222. District of Columbia Circuit has ruled in the
  223. case of Verizon et al. v. Federal Communications
  224. Commission (FCC), and it’s bad, bad news for net
  225. neutrality. The court struck down the FCC’s Open
  226. Internet regulations.
  227.  
  228.  These rules, as the FCC describes them, are
  229. there to preserve the Internet as we know it.
  230. Today’s Internet is “open because it uses free,
  231. publicly available standards that anyone can access
  232. and build to, and it treats all traffic that flows
  233. across the network in roughly the same way. The
  234. principle of the Open Internet is sometimes referred
  235. to as “net neutrality.” Under this principle,
  236. consumers can make their own choices about what
  237. applications and services to use and are free to
  238. decide what lawful content they want to access,
  239. create, or share with others. This openness promotes
  240. competition and enables investment and innovation."
  241.  
  242. So much for those noble ideas.
  243.  
  244.  If this decision is upheld after a potential
  245. appeal to the US Supreme Court, Verizon and buddies
  246. will be free to make content providers pay extra to
  247. increase the speed to their content. Or, worse still,
  248. Verizon, et al. would be free to charge media
  249. companies, such as CBS, or Internet content providers,
  250. such as Hulu Plus, Netflix, and Amazon, more money
  251. to get the same level of Internet broadband they do
  252. now.
  253.  
  254.  And, who at the end of the day will really get
  255. charged more? I’ll give you three guesses, and the
  256. first don’t count. Yes, that’s right, we the Internet
  257. users will end up paying more. The media companies
  258. and content providers will pass on the additional
  259. costs to you and me. ... ...
  260.  
  261.  Across the pond, the European Union is dead set
  262. in favor of net neutrality, so some companies might
  263. decide to host their Websites in Europe to avoid
  264. the US’ regulations. I could see Google/YouTube or
  265. Netflix doing that.
  266.    
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  268.    
  269. Verizon Inc. Attacks Net Neutrality
  270.  
  271.  CNBC's Jon Fortt explains how the Federal appeals
  272. court ruling on net neutrality directly affects
  273. content providers like Netflix.
  274.  
  275.  The US Federal Communications Commission may appeal
  276. the ruling by a US appeals court on Tuesday that struck
  277. down the agency's so-called net neutrality rules,
  278. according to FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler.
  279.  
  280.  "I am committed to maintaining our networks as engines
  281. for economic growth, test beds for innovative services
  282. and products, and channels for all forms of speech
  283. protected by the First Amendment," Wheeler said in
  284. a statement.
  285.  
  286.  "We will consider all available options, including
  287. those for appeal, to ensure that these networks on
  288. which the Internet depends continue to provide a free
  289. and open platform for innovation and expression, and
  290. operate in the interest of all Americans."
  291.  
  292.  The FCC's 2011 open Internet rules require Internet
  293. providers to treat all Web traffic equally and give
  294. consumers equal access to all lawful content but were
  295. challenged by Verizon Communications as excessive.
  296.  
  297.  The FCC did not have the legal authority to enact
  298. the regulations, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the
  299. District of Columbia Circuit said in its ruling.
  300.  
  301.  "Even though the commission has general authority
  302. to regulate in this arena, it may not impose requirements
  303. that contravene express statutory mandates," Judge
  304. David Tatel said.
  305.  
  306.  Although the three judge panel were unanimous about
  307. the outcome, one wrote separately that he would have
  308. gone even further in restricting the FCC's authority.
  309.  
  310.  The FCC could appeal the ruling to the full appeals
  311. court or to the US Supreme Court, or it could attempt
  312. to rewrite the regulations to satisfy the appeals court.
  313.  
  314.  During the oral argument in September, Verizon's
  315. lawyer said the regulations violated the company's
  316. right to free speech and stripped control of what its
  317. networks transmit and how.
  318.  
  319.  The eventual outcome of the dispute may determine
  320. whether internet providers can restrict some content
  321. by, for instance, blocking or slowing down access to
  322. particular sites or charging websites to deliver their
  323. content faster.
  324.    
  325.          ◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►◄►
  326.    
  327. Court Strikes Down Net Neutrality
  328.  
  329.  A federal court on Tuesday overturned the Federal
  330. Communications Commission's network-neutrality
  331. regulations.
  332.  
  333.  The FCC's net-neutrality rules, formally called the
  334. Open Internet Order and adopted in late 2010, bar
  335. Internet service providers from blocking websites or
  336. from discriminating against any Internet traffic,
  337. except for reasonable network management.
  338.  
  339.  Supporters of the rules argue they are critical for
  340. maintaining a free Internet. They argue that the Internet
  341. should be an open platform where all websites receive
  342. equal treatment, whether they are large corporate
  343. services or small start-ups.
  344.  
  345.  But Republicans and other critics argue the rules
  346. unnecessarily restrict the business decisions of
  347. Internet providers.
  348.  
  349.  After the oral argument in September, many observers
  350. anticipated that the DC Circuit would strike down at
  351. least part of the net neutrality order. But the court
  352. went even farther than many expected, throwing out
  353. both the anti-discrimination and anti-blocking provisions.
  354.  
  355.  The judges concluded that the FCC was inappropriately
  356. treating broadband Internet as a "common carrier" service.
  357. Traditional phone lines, railroads, airlines and other
  358. services are considered common carriers and must offer
  359. service to everyone.
  360.  
  361.  But because the FCC chose to classify broadband Internet
  362. as an "information service," it lacks the authority to
  363. impose common carrier obligations on it, the court ruled.
  364.  
  365.  It will now be up to FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler to decide
  366. how to respond to the ruling. In addition to appealing
  367. the decision to either the full DC Circuit or the
  368. Supreme Court, Wheeler could also decide to reclassify
  369. broadband as a "telecommunications service."
  370.  
  371.  Although the FCC has limited authority over "information
  372. services," it has wide authority over "telecommunications
  373. services," including the power to regulate them as common
  374. carriers.
  375.    
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  377.    
  378. Court Throws Net Neutrality Overboard
  379.  
  380.  In 2008 Comcast was ordered to stop interfering with
  381. BitTorrent traffic generated by its customers. In addition,
  382. the company had to disclose all of its network management
  383. practices.
  384.  
  385.  The Comcast case was the first to ignite a broad discussion
  386. about Net Neutrality and the setup for FCCs Open Internet Order
  387. which was released two years later.
  388.  
  389.  The Open Internet Order prescribes that all traffic on the
  390. Internet should be treated equally, but allows ISPs to slow
  391. down or block traffic if its considered to be reasonable
  392. network management.” For many Net Neutrality activists the
  393. rules didn’t go far enough, but it was something.
  394.  
  395.  Today the Open Internet Order was decimated by the DC
  396. Circuit Court of Appeals, which ruled against the commission.
  397. The Court states that the FCC does not have the power to
  398. regulate how ISPs manage traffic on their networks.
  399.  
  400.  “Given that the Commission has chosen to classify broadband
  401. providers in a manner that exempts them from treatment as
  402. common carriers, the Communications Act expressly prohibits
  403. the Commission from nonetheless regulating them as such.
  404. Because the Commission has failed to establish that the
  405. anti-discrimination and anti-blocking rules do not impose
  406. per se common carrier obligations, we vacate those portions
  407. of the Open Internet Order.”
  408.  
  409.  The Court didn’t throw out the entire Open Internet Order,
  410. and clarified that ISPs still have to disclose what kind of
  411. actions they take when “managing” traffic on their networks.
  412.  
  413.  The ruling leaves the FCC with two options. It could appeal
  414. at the Supreme Court or it could ask Congress to give it the
  415. powers it wants and/or needs. For now, however, ISPs are free
  416. to discriminate between different traffic types, and block
  417. certain sites or content.
  418.  
  419.  This could mean, for example, that certain types of traffic
  420. get priority over others, or that certain sites or services
  421. could be downgraded or blocked.
  422.  
  423.  The reasoning of the D.C. Court of Appeals is similar to
  424. an order it issued in 2010. At the time it overruled the
  425. FCCs decision to sanction Comcast for unfair treatment of
  426. BitTorrent users, arguing that the commission doesnt have
  427. the authority to enforce net neutrality.
  428.  
  429.  In a response to the bad news FCC Chairman Thomas Wheeler
  430. said that his organization is considering an appeal.
  431.  
  432.  “We will consider all available options, including those
  433. for appeal, to ensure that these networks on which the
  434. Internet depends continue to provide a free and open
  435. platform for innovation and expression, and operate in
  436. the interest of all Americans, Wheeler noted.
  437.  
  438.  Many Open Internet advocates are unhappy with today’s
  439. decision as well.
  440.  
  441.  Were disappointed that the court came to this conclusion.
  442. Its ruling means that Internet users will be pitted against
  443. the biggest phone and cable companies and in the absence
  444. of any oversight, these companies can now block and
  445. discriminate against their customers communications at
  446. will,” Free Press President and CEO Craig Aaron notes.
  447.  
  448.  The compromised Open Internet Order struck down today
  449. left much to be desired, but it was a step toward maintaining
  450. Internet users freedom to go where they wanted, when they
  451. wanted, and communicate freely online,” he adds.
  452.  
  453.  For BitTorrent users specifically not much is expected
  454. to change in the short-term, not even for Comcast
  455. subscribers. The Internet provider told TorrentFreak
  456. that it will continue to comply with the FCC’s Open
  457. Internet Order for at least six more years.
  458.  
  459.  Comcast has consistently supported the Commissions Open
  460. Internet Order as an appropriate balance of protection of
  461. consumer interests while not interfering with companies
  462. network management and engineering decisions,” a Comcast
  463. spokesperson said.
  464.  
  465.  This promise to keep the Internet “neutral” was part
  466. of the NBC Universal Transaction Order, which is valid
  467. until 2020.
  468.  
  469.  “We remain comfortable with that commitment because we
  470. have not and will not block our customers ability to
  471. access lawful Internet content, applications, or services.
  472. Comcasts customers want an open and vibrant Internet,
  473. and we are absolutely committed to deliver that experience,”
  474. the company added.
  475.  
  476.  So no BitTorrent blocking for now from Comcast, although
  477. we have to note that throttling would still be an option
  478. as long as it’s part of standard network management
  479. procedure, or targeted at unauthorized transfers.

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